October 22, 2014

Energy Fair is Conduit for Information

Energy Fair is Conduit for Information

Desert Valley Times
5/12/09
By Bob Challinor

Renewable energy is no longer relegated to pie-in-the-sky discussions between green living advocates. Saturday’s Mesquite Energy Fair demonstrated how renewable resources have gone mainstream.

The proof: more than 15 vendors and 275 visitors connected for six and a half hours at the first-ever Mesquite Energy Fair at CasaBlanca Resort.

The event, assembled by the Mesquite Task Force’s energy fair subcommittee, in conjunction with the city’s 25th anniversary celebration, enabled consumers to engage in one-on-one discussions with renewable energy system providers and installers and businesses offering energy efficiency/conservation products.

Michele Burkett, energy fair subcommittee chair who headed coordination of the energy fair, said the number of vendors and fair-goers exceeded her expectations.
Said Burkett, “The comments were: ‘This is great,’ ‘we learned a lot and we’d like to learn more;’ ‘it’s fantastic. We want it back next year.’ This is what we wanted for the community.”

Parked in front of the CasaBlanca casino was a trailer featuring a Coolerado air conditioner powered by a solar photovoltaic system.

“We’ve been trying to keep up with everyone all day,” said Charlie Goessman, owner of Tri-Force Mechanical Contractors, who manned the Coolerado exhibit.

The exhibit served as an introduction to the energy fair, which featured a gamut of renewable energy products. There were solar thermal water heaters, solar panel installation information, lighting, geo-exchange unit demonstrations, energy-conserving products from solar window screens to window tinting, an Overton Power District display and water-efficient landscape information.

Geo-thermal experts said geo-exchange systems “are, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, the most energy-efficient, environmentally-clean and cost-effective space conditioning systems available.” Power bills are reduced by 70 percent during the life of the system, they said.

DVT columnist Stewart Somerville, owner of Alternative Power Systems in Cedar City, gave a nuts-and-bolts lecture about on-the-grid and off-the-grid solar photovoltaic systems combined with energy efficiency measures homeowners can take to reduce power bills and stabilize energy costs.

Mike Stergois of Best Building and Lumber people could do all their green-product shopping in Mesquite.

“Over 75 percent of our staff is trained in green products,” he said. “We have over 1,500 products in stock building materials, plumbing, home décor and electrical.”
Stergois said switching to a greener lifestyle begins with making a home more energy efficient through installation of weather stripping, energy-conserving windows, insulation, lighting and energy-efficient appliances.

“Before you invest in the bigger renewable systems, make your home more energy efficient first to get the full value of those systems,” Stergois said.

Mayor Susan Holecheck said energy will be the most important issue within the next decade, adding that the community-created Mesquite Energy Fair was a reflection of “America’s can-do spirit.

“Now is the time to not only break our long-standing dependence on fossil fuels, but to go with the green industry with the creating of millions of jobs,” Holecheck said. “Energy will be the most important problem within the next decade. That’s why you’re all here today. The nation needs to develop safe, clean, secure and sustainable energy.”

Lydia Ball, energy outreach representative from Senator Harry Reid office, told the audience that the energy fair “was a perfect example of education to the people. These resources are here now.”

Linda Faas, member of Defend Our Desert, said: “I think people are very engaged in what’s happening here; they’re trying to get answers.”

Arlis Swartzendruber, vice-chair of the city’s Energy Task Force, said the fair was a good first step for community outreach, but wanted the task force to continue its mission to push for alternative energy options in homes and eventually attract green energy industry to Mesquite.

“I’d like to see developers that do small developments provide an option for solar-powered homes,” he said. “This has unlimited potential.”

“We’ve had people telling us that they want us to do it again,” said Jim Norris, energy fair subcommittee member. “They want more vendors next year and said the fair was really worthwhile. People are pumped.”

Vendors, too, reported that the fair had been worthwhile for them. They said people came to the fair armed with good questions, and several vendors said the fair brought them new customers.

“This is what the people want,” said Bob Davidow, Energy Task Force member. “They came for answers.”

Mike Stergois of Best Building and Lumber people could do all their green-product shopping in Mesquite.

“Over 75 percent of our staff is trained in green products,” he said. “We have over 1,500 products in stock building materials, plumbing, home décor and electrical.”
Stergois said switching to a greener lifestyle begins with making a home more energy efficient through installation of weather stripping, energy-conserving windows, insulation, lighting and energy-efficient appliances.

“Before you invest in the bigger renewable systems, make your home more energy efficient first to get the full value of those systems,” Stergois said.

Mayor Susan Holecheck said energy will be the most important issue within the next decade, adding that the community-created Mesquite Energy Fair was a reflection of “America’s can-do spirit.

“Now is the time to not only break our long-standing dependence on fossil fuels, but to go with the green industry with the creating of millions of jobs,” Holecheck said. “Energy will be the most important problem within the next decade. That’s why you’re all here today. The nation needs to develop safe, clean, secure and sustainable energy.”

Lydia Ball, energy outreach representative from Senator Harry Reid office, told the audience that the energy fair “was a perfect example of education to the people. These resources are here now.”

Linda Faas, member of Defend Our Desert, said: “I think people are very engaged in what’s happening here; they’re trying to get answers.”

Arlis Swartzendruber, vice-chair of the city’s Energy Task Force, said the fair was a good first step for community outreach, but wanted the task force to continue its mission to push for alternative energy options in homes and eventually attract green energy industry to Mesquite.

“I’d like to see developers that do small developments provide an option for solar-powered homes,” he said. “This has unlimited potential.”

“We’ve had people telling us that they want us to do it again,” said Jim Norris, energy fair subcommittee member. “They want more vendors next year and said the fair was really worthwhile. People are pumped.”

Vendors, too, reported that the fair had been worthwhile for them. They said people came to the fair armed with good questions, and several vendors said the fair brought them new customers.

“This is what the people want,” said Bob Davidow, Energy Task Force member. “They came for answers.”